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Professor Keith Martin confirmed as guest lecturer for the PWIS Prizegiving day at Queens College, Cambridge.

Professor Keith Martin has been confirmed as guest lecturer and member of the judging panel for the PWIS Prizegiving Day, which will take place on 24 February 2018 at the University of Cambridge.

 

Professor Keith Martin is a Professor in the Departments of Clinical Neurosciences and Ophthalmology at the University of Cambridge and an Honorary Consultant Ophthalmologist within the National Health Service at Addenbrooke’s Hospital where he leads the Glaucoma Service.

 

He is also President-elect of the World Glaucoma Association, the largest glaucoma organisation in the world. Professor Martin’s research interests include the mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma and he is developing neuroprotection strategies to slow the progression of glaucomatous visual loss, and ultimately to restore vision.

 

He graduated in Neuroscience from Cambridge University in 1990 and from Oxford University Clinical School in 1993. He trained in General Medicine and Neurology at the Hammersmith Hospital and the National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery in London and the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford. His Higher Specialist Training in Ophthalmology was undertaken in Cambridge before three years of Research and Clinical Fellowship Training in glaucoma with Harry Quigley at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore and with Professor Peng Khaw at the Institute of Ophthalmology, UCL.

 

His research group was the first to demonstrate that increased expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor through AAV-medicated gene therapy demonstrated a protective effect on RGC loss in a model of glaucoma. He is the Chief Scientific Officer of Quethera, a gene therapy company and is developing therapies to reduce progressive visual loss in glaucoma and other conditions affecting the optic nerve.
 

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